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Creating An Inclusive Environment at Your Nonprofit: Age

In March, The Community Foundation Serving Richmond and Central Virginia gathered alumni of its Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program (ENLP) and current members of its 10th class at the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia.   Jonathan Zur, President and CEO of Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities led the group through a robust discussion and brainstorming session on ways local organizations and leaders can take action to create a culture of diversity and inclusion in their nonprofit organizations and across the sector.

In a recent blog post, we shared that diversity is the presence of difference generally related to one’s identity and might include ability status, age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  Inclusion is the accepting, respecting, and valuing of this diversity.  Working to achieve diversity and inclusion in the workplace should be a fundamental part of fulfilling the mission of any nonprofit. It creates an environment of involvement and connection and allows for the richness of ideas, backgrounds and perspectives to be harnessed to create value for the organization, clients and the community.

To begin moving towards active inclusion in the workplace, nonprofit leaders must 1) examine their own lens to have a deeper understanding of their perspectives and perceptions to create a framework for approaching and addressing their own bias – whether that be conscious or unconscious.  Nonprofit leaders must 2) ask and encourage tough questions to create deeper dialogue within their organization, especially with staff who come from different backgrounds than them.  This will allow the leader to develop a clearer understanding of how experiences affect work styles, behavior, communications, and relationships and eventually form an atmosphere of greater trust.  Nonprofit leaders must 3) acknowledge institutional bias, which are the practices, policies, structures and traditions that push some people up and others down based solely on identity. It’s important leaders realize that institutional bias may exist in their own organization causing barriers towards inclusion and ultimately, equity and justice.

 

Local Barriers and Suggestions for Interventions

What are some of the barriers that organizations, leaders and staff create in local nonprofit organizations that prevent diversity and inclusion (in both the workplace itself and with clients and the community)? What are actions steps that they can take to intervene and overcome these barriers, leading to a more inclusive nonprofit environment?  The Emerging Nonprofit Leaders group analyzed several different “Identities” in relation to their own organization and below are the findings.  This week we focus on one of nine identities – “Age”.  In later posts, we will focus in on the others – ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  Make sure to read our previous post on Ability Status.

Age

Ageism is the stereotyping or discrimination of a person or group of people because of their age.  Typically, ageism refers to older individuals but more recently, the definition has broadened to include “any prejudice or discrimination against or in favor of any age group.”

Local nonprofit leaders saw a few patterns and occurrences in the workplace – particularly relating to ageism perceptions and the negative implications they can have.   The group discovered that individuals are often grouped into categories related to interests and abilities based on age.  For example, younger staff were considered more tech savvy, while older staff were thought to be uninterested in technology and not willing to learn.

Other occurrences included assumptions and perceptions based on age related to one’s viewpoints, work styles and work ethics.  Younger participants reported having issues with their perspectives not being valued or taken seriously, as well as having a perceived “lack of experience” and not being given the opportunity to give input or perform.  Older participants reported that their perspectives were considered outdated, and therefore not valued, as well as feeling discriminated against in the hiring process – with assumptions being made that “an organization can’t afford to hire me”.

A recent article in Profiles in Diversity Journal confirmed many of these sentiments saying, “Within each generation is a relatively benign but present ageist view on the surrounding generations. Boomers think Millennials are careless and, although educated, only educated topically; they can do their jobs, but take away their computers and they won’t have a clue, unlike Boomers and Generation X. Millennials tend to think of Boomers and Generation X as behind the times as well as technology-resistant and inept. What all generations need to understand is that that everyone benefits from generational diversity in the workplace.”

The group had many great ideas on interventions to overcome some of these barriers to move towards generational diversity and inclusion in the workplace.  One of the most important tactics is education against stereotypes in the workplace.  Another suggestion is to create occasions (facilitated or not) for intergenerational conversation topics, or go a step further and create intentional intergenerational project teams.  Read this article by the Nonprofit Times on 8 Steps to Creating an Age Diverse Culture for tips to get started.

Other ideas included creating opportunities like mentorships and/or internships to promote intergenerational interaction and relationship building.  The Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA (YNPN RVA) has tips for mentors and mentees for Building Relationships, and this article by Next Avenue explains the concept of “Reverse Mentorships” where an older worker might seek out guidance from a much younger worker.  If you’re looking for advice for creating an internship, you can check out ConnectVA’s many articles on related topics, as well as our “Connect to Students” page which shares contact information from each local school/department for finding interns.

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ConnectVA Spotlight: Eric Drumheller, Director of Client Benefits and Special Projects, RRSI

Tell us about yourself.

Hi, my name is Eric Drumheller and I am the Director of Client Benefits and Special Projects at Richmond Residential Services, Inc.   I truly enjoy being a part of RRSI and its mission to provide person-centered care to people with intellectual disabilities, focusing on the whole individual, while encouraging choice, growth and community participation.  I am a native Virginian and a graduate of Virginia Commonwealth University.  I have been working with nonprofit organizations for the past 17 years.

RRSI owns and maintains several group homes located in quality neighborhoods, which are easily accessible and designed with their clients in mind.

What is the focus of your work?

I am responsible for the Representative Payee Program which provides financial management for the Social Security and SSI payments of beneficiaries who are not able to manage their benefits due to a disability.  We work with area social service agencies such as Virginia Supportive Housing, the Daily Planet, as well as Community Service Boards in Richmond, Henrico, Chesterfield, Hanover and Petersburg to help identify individuals who need support with managing their benefits.

What do you find most rewarding about your work?

One of the most rewarding parts about my work is our clients.   An initial step we take in helping someone manage their benefits is to work together to develop a budget.   That budget changes many of our clients’ understanding of their benefits and where their money was going previously.    It is truly rewarding when a client can now afford their housing and has money for other needs as well.

RRSI began partnering with local Social Services agencies who work with the homeless population.   It has been very rewarding to become part of a team to help someone live in permanent, safe and affordable housing.

What are some major challenges you have faced and how you handled them?

I think our major challenge today is the current political climate. Everyday seems to bring change – good or bad that impacts just about everyone.  We hear from our clients who are worried about their health care benefits through Medicaid and Medicare.  We hear from other nonprofits who, like us, are concerned about changes in funding.  We are impacted by any HUD funding reductions which could restrict access to affordable housing for people with disabilities.  We are concerned about changes to Medicaid in Virginia and how that will impact the services we provide.

At RRSI we are faced with these challenges but through our strong Board and Senior Management Team, we work towards being resilient to change.  Our Board members are a wonderful team of leaders who look to the future and the changing environment to help us plan ahead.  As part of the Senior Management Team we believe that through advocacy and working with other non-profits and political leaders we can continue our mission to provide person-centered support to individuals with intellectual disabilities.

Do you have any interesting initiatives or programs on the horizon?

We are advisers to a client-lead self-advocacy group called the Four Seasons.  This group meets monthly to discuss issues of concern to individuals with intellectual disabilities, e.g., healthy relationships, good listening, and bullying, and sponsors dances and other community events.  RRSI is hosting a Walk-a-thon on June 24th to raise funds for this great program that is open to anyone with an intellectual disability and who is interested in learning about advocacy and advocating for others.

 

Is your organization involved in any exciting collaborations or partnerships?

We have partnered with three universities, Virginia Commonwealth University, Longwood College and the University of Phoenix, to provide internships to students in the Social Work programs.   We have also partnered with a wonderful organization here in Richmond called Partnership for the Future.  PFF provides high-potential high school students from challenging circumstances in the metro-Richmond area with tools and experience necessary to attain a college degree.   This has been a great learning experience for the school and the students but also for our agency staff and clients.  We look forward to continuing this partnership for years to come.

 

Eric speaks to a group of young nonprofit professionals about his experience in the Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program.

 

How are you leveraging ConnectVA/The Community Foundation to achieve your mission?

ConnectVA is a valuable tool to help us find additional resources, workshops and other professional development classes for our staff.  I completed the Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program (ENLP) in 2013. That training was and continues to be a vital learning opportunity in my own leadership development.  I am currently in the Alumni class of that program, Transforming RVA, which exposes us to transformational leadership through lectures by and discussions with many local leaders who are making a remarkable difference in Richmond.

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The Help Somebody Hall of Fame

THE HELP SOMEBODY HALL OF FAME

Sandy Sisisky, Board Member, JFS and Weinstein JCC

Katharine Hunt, Youth Life Foundation Richmond

Albert Negrin, Volunteer, CKG Foundation

Patricia Taylor, CNA, Family Lifeline

Robbie Schureman, Volunteer, Virginia Dental Association Foundation

Jocelyn Marencik, Founder, Got Tec! Richmond

 
 

NOMINATE SOMEONE WHO HELPS

Have you witnessed someone selflessly going out of their way to improve the life of another?  Do you seek a simple way to recognize and commend them for their benevolence?  The Help Somebody Hall of Fame is a platform to express your gratitude for this person and share stories that may inspire others to act with generosityA nonprofit organization could also receive $1000 in honor of the person you nominate (see below).

 

THE INSPIRATION

The inspiration behind the Help Somebody Hall of Fame is Thomas Cannon, a retired postal worker who gave away more than $150,000 over three decades, mostly in thousand-dollar checks, showing that small gestures can make a big impact. He gave to people who demonstrated remarkable courage or generosity, or who experienced a challenging time, often reading about them in the Richmond Times Dispatch.  According to a 2005 Richmond Times Dispatch article published shortly after his death, Thomas Cannon did not want to attach his name to any efforts to carry on his philanthropy.  “What he wanted in his honor and memory, he told the Times-Dispatch, was simple: ‘Help Somebody.’”

 

NOMINATION

Nominations can recognize a nonprofit staff member, client, volunteer, neighbor.…anyone residing in Greater Richmond who you want to commend for making a positive difference.  We’ll add a new name to the Hall of Fame two times each month, and feature their story on ConnectVA.org and through social media.

Take a few minutes to share their name and story by completing a simple nomination form and answering three questions:

1)  How does this person demonstrate the spirit of the “Help Somebody Hall of Fame” – acting selflessly to improve the life of someone else?

2) What is the impact of their generosity?

3) Is there anything else you want to share about your nominee that makes them unique and/or a model for making a positive difference (optional)?

 

NOMINATION FORM

The Nomination form can be found here: http://bit.ly/HelpSomebodyForm

 

AWARD

Each quarter, a random drawing will be held and two $1,000 awards will be made to a nonprofit organization, in honor of a nominated outstanding community member (chosen by the nominee).  The award is made possible by an anonymous donor through The Community Foundation serving Richmond and Central Virginia.

 

QUESTIONS?

Email us at admin@connectva.org

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Creating a More Inclusive Environment at Your Nonprofit: Barriers and Interventions for Ability Status

In March, The Community Foundation Serving Richmond and Central Virginia gathered alumni of its Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program (ENLP) and current members of its 10th class at the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia.   Jonathan Zur, President and CEO of Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities led the group through a robust discussion and brainstorming session on ways local organizations and leaders can take action to create a culture of diversity and inclusion (D&I) in their nonprofit organizations and across the sector.

In a recent blog post, we shared that diversity is the presence of difference generally related to one’s identity and might include ability status, age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  Inclusion is the accepting, respecting, and valuing of this diversity.  Working to achieve diversity and inclusion in the workplace should be a fundamental part of fulfilling the mission of any nonprofit. It creates an environment of involvement and connection and allows for the richness of ideas, backgrounds and perspectives to be harnessed to create value for the organization, clients and the community.

To begin moving towards active inclusion in the workplace, nonprofit leaders must 1) examine their own lens to have a deeper understanding of their perspectives and perceptions to create a framework for approaching and addressing their own bias – whether that be conscious or unconscious.  Nonprofit leaders must 2) ask and encourage tough questions to create deeper dialogue within their organization, especially with staff who come from different backgrounds than them.  This will allow the leader to develop a clearer understanding of how experiences affect work styles, behavior, communications, and relationships and eventually form an atmosphere of greater trust.  Nonprofit leaders must 3) acknowledge institutional bias, which are the practices, policies, structures and traditions that push some people up and others down based solely on identity. It’s important leaders realize that institutional bias may exist in their own organization causing barriers towards inclusion and ultimately, equity and justice.

 

Local Barriers and Suggestions for Interventions

What are some of the barriers that organizations, leaders and staff create in local nonprofit organizations that prevent diversity and inclusion (in both the workplace itself and with clients and the community)? What are actions steps that they can take to intervene and overcome these barriers, leading to a more inclusive nonprofit environment?  The Emerging Nonprofit Leaders group analyzed several different “Identities” in relation to their own organization and below are the findings.  This week we focus on one of nine identities – Ability Status.  In later posts, we will focus in on the others – age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  

Ability Status

Individuals with disabilities are often stigmatized, encountering attitudinal and physical barriers both in work and in daily life. Although federal legislation (i.e. The Americans With Disabilities Act) protects the inherent rights of individuals with disabilities, that legislation can’t always protect them from subtle forms of discrimination and prejudice. Some disabilities are more obvious but some may be hidden, known as invisible disability. There are many types of disabilities, including those that affect a person’s vision, hearing, thinking, learning, movement, mental health, communicating etc.

During the D&I session, participants reported a lack of physical accessibility in their workplace where there are no elevators, ramps or accessible restrooms.  They also mentioned the importance of considering the building and space accessibility when choosing an office location – for both staff and clients.  If you’re wondering if your older building is ADA Compliant, read this helpful article.   The nonprofit leaders also mentioned how physically demanding their roles often are, and they imagine that this could hinder someone with restrictions.  A common thread throughout the discussion was related to funding and support from grant makers.  To make physical organization changes, funding might be required, so grant makers need to be included in this conversation as well.

The participants reiterated that hiring practices within their organizations need to be adapted to accommodate individuals of all abilities, and policies must be established to address situations that might arise.  In general, there is a need for the organization and human resources to be more aware of legislation, as well as resources and assistance available to nonprofits to move them towards being proactive in this regard.  Furthermore, nonprofit leaders must cultivate an environment where staff feel comfortable asking for what they need or for help, particularly when it comes to mental health concerns.

The Department for Aging and Rehabilitative Services (DARS) is a valuable resource that offers services to employers to help with recruiting, screening, training and retention efforts. Additionally, Virginia Business Leadership Network is a business-to-business (B2B) association focused on increasing workforce and marketplace diversity through the inclusion of individuals with disabilities.  They offer training and toolkits that include information like the Job Accommodation Network that provides free, expert, and confidential guidance on workplace accommodations and disability employment issues.

This summer, the Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities (VCIC) is a hosting a session on “Including People with Disabilities” during their Workplace Inclusion Network (WIN).  WIN is a convening of professionals who support or lead diversity and inclusion efforts within their organizations. These gatherings provide a unique opportunity for D&I leaders to hear from experts in the field and share best practices with one another while networking with professionals from across the region.

Stay tuned for more findings on D&I in local nonprofits in the upcoming weeks!

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ConnectVA Spotlight: Megan Rollins, President and CEO, Boaz & Ruth

Tell us about yourself.

My name is Megan Rollins and I’m the President/CEO of Boaz & Ruth. I grew up in Richmond and attended Mary Baldwin College, now Mary Baldwin University. I have been with Boaz & Ruth for 10 years starting as the volunteer coordinator and have had the opportunity to learn about nonprofit management when opportunities through staff transition took place over the years.

Located along a four-block section of the Meadowbridge Road commercial corridor, Boaz & Ruth’s six social enterprises are designed to achieve both financial and social returns.

What is the need you’re trying to address? 

Our mission is to rebuild lives and communities through relationships, training, transitional jobs and economic revitalization.  We primarily serve returning citizens who are looking for an opportunity to rebuild their lives. We run a national, biblically based curriculum, Jobs for Life, to help our participants understand God has a plan for their life which includes meaningful work that provides dignity and hope for the future.

 

What do you find most rewarding about your work? 

The most rewarding part of my job is the relationships with participants, graduates, staff and community members; especially participants who are putting in the work to create a different future for themselves. In addition I get to work with graduates and staff who are dedicated and hardworking who show me every day what it looks like to live by faith.

 

What are some major challenges you have faced and how you handled them?

Over the past four years we have been focused on financial stability to ensure we are here to serve people and our community for another 15 years. To do this the board had to make hard decisions that have paid off. We focused on increasing income, decreasing expenses and leveraging partnerships. This meant temporarily suspending programs and a reduction in staff. What remained was a core group of graduates, staff and board members who rolled up their sleeves and went to work in a new way with a renewed commitment to serving returning citizens. We just finished a strategic plan focusing on program redesign which is exciting, providing us with new energy and reaching out to build new partnerships.

 

What’s one misconception the public has about your organization? 

I think most people thought we were on a slow march toward closing. Thankfully many people and organizations have been supportive of the change management work we have done and are now in the renewing stage of a nonprofits lifecycle.

Richard Huff, April 2017 Jobs for Life graduate

Do you have any interesting initiatives or programs on the horizon? 

We are working on program redesign and are building new partnerships. At one time, Boaz & Ruth was the trainer and employer for participants. We are now looking for partners to provide part time, transitional employment for participants in select industries including food service, maintenance, janitorial and construction. We are also strengthening data collection and measurements.

 

Tell us more about the partnerships and collaborations you are involved in.

Storefront for Community Design came to us in 2015 with an idea for a youth innovation center in Highland Park that specifically serves high school youth. Storefront pulled together Saving Our Youth, GroundworkRVA and ART180 to apply for the The Robins Foundation Community Innovation Grant. With the support of Virginia LISC they won the second place grant in December of 2015. This led to the 6 Points Innovations Center (6PIC for short).

With a focus on re-entry and being strategic in our partnerships Boaz & Ruth recognizes the need for multiple interruption points in the cycle of poverty, we see the 6PIC nonprofits as partners in interruption. We were excited to leverage our assets and provide a space for collaboration between four strong nonprofits. To that end, 6 Points Innovation Center’s ribbon cutting ceremony is scheduled for June 6th.

Storefront for Community Design, Saving Our Youth and Groundwork RVA will be headquartered along the Meadowbridge corridor providing presence and innovative programing for high school students who live in Highland Park and attend John Marshall, Community, Franklin Military and Armstrong High Schools.

 

Six Points Innovation Center (6PIC) is a newly renovated 4,000 square-foot building located at 3001 Meadowbridge Road in Highland Park that is a safe, fully- programmed teen center where neighborhood youth have access to innovative programming in the arts, urban ecology, education assistance, public media, public history, and advocacy.  As an engaging hub of community revitalization, youth activity and non-profit collaboration, 6PIC fills a gap in afterschool programming, providing resources , and education for neighborhood teens, while encouraging them to become Changemakers for their community.

 

How are you leveraging ConnectVA to achieve your mission?

We receive ConnectVA’s daily email communications and look for training opportunities for staff and graduates. It helps us to remain up to date on nonprofit news.

 

 

Anything else you would like to share? 

Like every other nonprofit we are always looking for new board members and partners. In addition, we have multiple spaces we make available to nonprofit and community partners for meetings.

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Help Somebody Spotlight: Jocelyn Marencik, Founder, Got Tec! Richmond

We are honored to have received (and are still receiving!) so many incredible nominations for the Help Somebody Hall of Fame.  This week we are highlighting the work of a Sophomore Student from Deep Run High School – Jocelyn Marencik.  Jocelyn founded the initiative “Got Tec! Richmond” whose mission is to deliver needed technology equipment to underserved schools, teachers, and students in the Richmond area.  She was nominated by her proud father, Don.

Jocelyn dedicates countless hours to community service and is truly a role model for young people in our community.  She said, “I’ve made community service a part of my life since Kindergarten. In 7th grade I ran my own fundraiser at Moody Middle to raise over $1,500 for both the school PTA and “From the Heart Stitchers”, which gives their hats, blankets, etc. to the homeless, people going through chemo, and babies in need. I’ve also helped make hundreds of hats for them. This year I decided to blend my love of technology with community service and came up with “Got Tec Richmond”, which stands for Gifts of Technology (for) Teachers, Education & Children.”

Read more about Jocelyn’s story and her impact in the community:

How does Jocelyn demonstrate the spirit of the “Help Somebody Hall of Fame”? 

Jocelyn founded and manages a local community initiative named “Got Tec Richmond” which funds and delivers technology equipment to under-served schools in the Richmond area (mainly RPS). She generates funds for the initiative by crocheting and selling hats, scarves, and blankets and selling them, by selling elastic band bracelets she makes, through community aluminum recycling drives, through micro-grants, and commercial and individual donations.

With the donated equipment she then organizes, teaches, and mentors at “Learn to Code” days at the same schools with the help of the ITRT’s (Instructional Technology Resource Teacher) at the particular school. This helps the students learn 21st century computer and other technological skills to help them succeed throughout school and beyond. Having modern technology equipment also helps the teachers at the school with additional tools and creative methods to further enhance learning. Overall this gives those in inner city schools the same learning opportunities as those in the better financed suburbs providing an avenue for future success. Jocelyn spends 5-10 hours each week on her initiative fundraising, marketing, delivering equipment to schools, organizing learning events, and mentoring/teaching others about computer coding.

 

What is the impact of her generosity? 

Jocelyn has been able to fund technology equipment for teachers and students in 23 separate RPS schools and 47 total classrooms. This includes two entire technology libraries consisting of Chromebooks and tablets. The indirect impact is well over 1300 students. The estimated value of the donated equipment is over $12,000 after only one year of existence of the initiative.

She has also organized and mentored at 6 learn to code events so far impacting 200 students directly who attended. Again, this has provided students an opportunity to learn needed 21st century skills they otherwise wouldn’t have. Also in a partnership with the Virtual Learning Center at MIT and the Scratch Foundation, she will shortly be donating two sets of Scratch language learning cars to each and every Richmond elementary and middle school for the ITRT’s and teachers to use as guides for setting up technology lessons plans and activities.

 

Is there anything else you want to share about Jocelyn?

Jocelyn is a sophomore in the Center for Information Technology at Deep Run High School in Glen Allen, VA. She has won a National Center for Women & Information Technology Virginia affiliate award and is a She ++ Include Fellow.

She is an officer of the CIT and DRHS Key Club and is a member of the Computer Science National Honor Society. Jocelyn founded the initiative as it meshes her two loves of computer technology and community service. She also crochets hats and blankets for donation to cancer patients through “From the Heart Stitchers”, has donated over 5200 food and other items to the Henrico Christmas Mother drive over her school years and has organized drives of cat food, litter and toys for CARE (Cat Adoption & Rescue Efforts).

 

About the Help Somebody Hall of Fame:

The Help Somebody Hall of Fame is a platform to express gratitude for a person in the community who acts selflessly to improve the lives of others.  We want to share these stories in hope of inspiring more people in Greater Richmond to act with generosity.  There will be random drawing from those who are honored, and two honorees will select a nonprofit of their choice to receive $1000.  Read more about how to nominate someone here.

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Report Roundup: Nonprofit Technology 2017

Here at ConnectVA we have our ears to the ground for news, trends, and data that could impact your work. A few of the reports we captured last year in our 5 New Reports to Help You Do Your Work post are still relevant, but some new reports have come out that we thought you’d want to know about:

  • 2017 Nonprofit Communications Trends ReportJust like last year, Kivi Leroux Miller of Nonprofit Marketing Guide, has compiled comprehensive data surveyed from nonprofit professionals on the state of nonprofit communications in 2017. This year she goes a step further to include new and different questions like “What are typical staffing and budgeting levels for nonprofit communications teams?” and “Just how important are fundraising goals to nonprofit communications teams?”.
  • 2017 Benchmarks Study – Recently released, the 2017 M+R Benchmarks Study is report and analysis of nonprofit email messaging, email list size, fundraising, online advocacy, web traffic, digital ads, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and more for the calendar year of 2016.
  • The State of Peer to Peer Fundraising 2017 by DonorDrive – Insight, research and statistics that dives deeper into why corporate partnerships are important, what motivates fundraisers and why supporters expect fundraising options.
  • 2017 Digital Outlook Report – A joint effort between care2, hjc, NTEN and the Resource Alliance this report captures the nonprofit sector’s changing digital strategy landscape. This year they grouped nonprofits into three levels of proficiency based on survey responses and shared insights accordingly in “Advance Your Nonprofit’s Game to the Next Level”.
  • 2016 Charitable Giving Report – For the fifth year, Blackbaud reports on overall fundraising efforts in the US, specifically on overall and online fundraising trends by sector and organization size, the impact of mobile giving on online fundraising, how #GivingTuesday is dramatically shaping year-end fundraising plus key stats on donation amounts, donor characteristics, retention, and more from across the U.S. nonprofit sector.

We’ve also added these reports to our Nonprofit Technology resource page.

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YNPN RVA Recommends: Advice for Developing Your Nonprofit Staff

While mission and impact are the heart and soul of a nonprofit, there are many integral parts behind the scenes that make the magic happen. Beyond defining your mission and establishing metrics to measure your impact, it is essential to nurture your people. Yes, your people are your volunteers, donors and supporters, but your people are first and foremost your staff. The hardworking nonprofiteer that is daily putting your mission into action – teaching parents financial literacy, educating teens on healthy lifestyle choices, or providing meals to hungry children. And yet, many organization and nonprofit executives neglect or lack any formal strategic talent development or career progression plan for their staff – and to their loss

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ConnectVA Spotlight: Beth Vann-Turnbull, Housing Families First

Tell us about yourself. My name is Beth Vann-Turnbull and I’m the Executive Director of Housing Families First. I’m a native of Virginia and attended the University of Richmond. I have spent the past 20+ years working in nonprofit organizations in Georgia and Virginia, specifically in smaller nonprofits that provide housing and healthcare opportunities for underserved families.

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Nonprofit Tips: Building an Effective CEO/Board Chair Relationship

As part of a Board Chair Series, Leadership Metro Richmond, The Community Foundation and Sands Anderson brought together Board Leaders from around Greater Richmond to learn and discuss best practices for building effective organization leadership – particularly around the relationship between the Executive Director (ED) and Board Chair. The CEO of ChildSavers Robert Bolling, along with Immediate Past Chair Linda Schreiner, talked in-depth about how they created an effective working relationship during their tenure of leading the organization together.

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