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YNPN RVA Spotlight: Great Nonprofit Bosses 2017

This past Monday, we celebrated National Boss Appreciation Day!

In the spirit of appreciating great leadership in our local nonprofit sector, we are highlighting a few of YNPN RVA’s 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses.  In case you missed last week’s post – here are all of the 26 Great Nonprofit Bosses chosen by young nonprofit professionals around Greater Richmond!

Read on to learn more about four nonprofit bosses who will be speaking about their professional careers, leadership and growth during the 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses Celebration with YNPN RVA on November 1st at the Hippodrome Speakeasy!  Make sure to purchase a ticket and join us for an evening of recognition, learning and socializing with nonprofit peers and leaders!

Robert Bolling, Chief Executive Officer, ChildSavers

Robert Bolling is the CEO at ChildSavers, a 90+ year-old not-for-profit agency that provides child mental health and child development services in the greater Richmond, VA community. Prior to this position, Robert served as Executive Director of the William Byrd Community House, a community based agency that serves the needs of children and families in the tradition of the settlement house movement of the early 19th century.

Other nonprofit work includes Boaz & Ruth, an agency that helps the formerly incarcerated to achieve independence, and The Healing Place, a long-term residential recovery center for homeless men suffering from addiction.  Early in his career Robert ran a youth workforce development program that helped high school and college students find summer employment.

Robert’s professional career spans nearly three decades and includes experiences in the public and private sectors before his not-for-profit career. Robert has lived and taught school in Botswana, Africa, at a multi-racial private school founded in opposition to apartheid.

Robert is a graduate of Amherst College with a degree in political science. He also completed a post-college, two-year fellowship through Amherst.  Robert has studied leadership at the Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia and completed coursework in Virginia Commonwealth University’s Snead School of Business. He is a member of the 2005 Class of Leadership Metro Richmond.

Here’s what Robert’s colleagues had to say about him: “He is personable, has an infectious passion, is a great listener, does not withhold feedback, and knows how to highlight good work.  Robert does not lead by telling us what we are going to do, he leads by listening and responding. This makes him a very effective leader, and inspiring to work with.”

 

Chris Hairston-White, VP of External Affairs, Better Housing Coalition  

Chris joined the Better Housing Coalition (BHC) in 2015 as Vice President of External Affairs, overseeing BHC’s fundraising, communications and policy efforts.   The Better Housing Coalition, a non-profit community development corporation, transforms communities through high-quality, eco-friendly affordable housing.

Prior to joining BHC, she was a Vice President and Senior Business Banking Relationship Manager at Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., where she managed a portfolio of business clients with gross annual revenues from $2 million to $20 million. In addition to her position at Wells Fargo, Chris’s 12-year banking career includes retail and commercial banking experience with Premier Bank, Inc. (formerly Consolidated Bank & Trust) and Bank of America.

Ms. Hairston-White serves on the Board of Directors of Bon Secours Richmond Health System; Audit & Compliance Committee Member, the Commercial Real Estate for Women (CREW) Richmond board, ART180’s Finance Committee, Cultural Art Center’s Craft + Design Show Committee, and ChamberRVA’s Brand Committee. Previous service includes ART180 Board, Joint Hospital Board of Bon Secours Health System Richmond, Board membership for the Virginia Tourism Authority and F.I.R.S.T. Contractors, Inc; and the Associates Board for Richmond CenterStage Foundation.

Chris received her B.S. in Business from Virginia Commonwealth University and is a member of Leadership Metro Richmond’s class of 2009.

Here’s what Chris’s colleagues had to say about her: “Chris leads by example. She’s a coach, an obstacle remover. She’s creative, energetic, hardworking, and expects excellence from all team members. She innately understands our strengths and capabilities, and uses these insights to draw the best from us.”

 

Myra Goodman Smith, President & CEO, Leadership Metro Richmond

Myra Goodman Smith is the President and CEO of Leadership Metro Richmond (LMR), our region’s community leadership development and engagement organization, which has served our community for 37 years.

Myra has a wide range of mission driven management and leadership experience. Serving at United Way of Greater Richmond and Petersburg for 23 years, Myra was the Vice President of Community Programs, Organizational Development & Planning, Operations and Corporate & Foundation Relations.  Myra also served as VP of Campaigns, leading the region’s largest community-wide campaign, generating $22.6 million.  Prior to United Way, she was an Institutional Researcher and an Economic and Community Development Planner.

She serves on the national board of the Association of Leadership Programs, the advisory boards of VCU LEAD, the Institute of Philanthropy at UR, the Junior League, the Capital Region Collaborative, Bridging Richmond and as Treasurer of the Jenkins Foundation.  Virginia Lawyers Weekly named Myra as one of the most “Influential Women in Virginia”.

Myra holds a Bachelor’s degree in Urban Studies and Planning and a Masters of Public Administration from Virginia Commonwealth University.

Here’s what Myra’s colleagues had to say about her: “Authenticity, accountability and accessibility are what make Myra an effective leader.  Myra is always her true self.  She is an advocate for inclusion, a champion for diversity, and an exemplary servant leader.  She has a genuine love for the Richmond region and the many communities that it encompasses.”

 

Megan Hodges, Director of Development, NAMI Virginia

Megan Hodges Mann has over a decade of professional experience in fund development, which stems from her love of connecting volunteers and donors with the “right fit” or non-profit cause for them. She currently serves as the Director of Development for NAMI Virginia (National Alliance on Mental Illness of Virginia) where she is responsible for the organization’s fundraising, budget and marketing.

Previously, she worked at JDRF and the American Cancer Society where she was responsible for fundraising, support and educational programs, and volunteer management. Megan earned her B.A in Sociology – Criminology and Spanish, with a minor in English, from Lynchburg College.

She is a 2012 graduate of Mentor Richmod through the Greater Richmond Chamber of Commerce and a 2014 graduate of the Emerging Nonprofit Leadership Program.

Megan recently completed the Board Immersion Program through Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia and participated in the Professional Partnership Program through VAFRE (Virginia Association of Fundraising Executives). She is passionate about access to quality and affordable healthcare, and this value drives her volunteer and professional activities. Megan is a member of VAFRE and YNPN RVA (Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA).

Here’s what Megan’s colleagues had to say about her: “It is evident from her involvement in her employees’ and volunteers’ time at work that she wants to see people succeed and grow while looking to prepare the best talent for the Richmond area non-profit scene. She is highly invested in her people and models excellent ethical and work behavioral choices in her role that set up those who work for her to learn best practices for a bright future at our organization and beyond.”

Congratulations to all of the 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses!  We hope you will join us at YNPN RVA’s Great Nonprofit Bosses Celebration Event on 11/1!  All are welcome!

 

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YNPN RVA Presents: 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses

The Young Nonprofits Professional Network RVA (YNPN RVA) believes that a great boss or supervisor supports, inspires and pushes others towards excellence; is an effective communicator, passionate, intuitive and resourceful; and finally, is truly committed to developing the careers of the people they supervise.

Over the past several weeks, YNPN RVA sent out a call to young nonprofit professionals all over Greater Richmond to nominate their boss or supervisor to be recognized as a part of our Great Nonprofit Bosses Celebration on November 1st at the Hippodrome Speakeasy from 6pm to 8pm.

Below are the 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses, along with an excerpt from the accolades they received from the person who nominated them!

2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses in RVA:

Elizabeth Bass, Executive Director, Virginia Mentoring Partnership 

“She is incredibly supportive of new project ideas from younger employees and will consider each suggestion with thoughtful constructive feedback. I feel that my own professional skills have strengthened tremendously under Elizabeth’s guidance”

Kerry Blumberg, Executive Director, Ronald McDonald House Charities of Richmond     

“Kerry is an effective leader because she is able to see all aspects of our organization and how each intermingle to support our mission. She has a strong passion for strategic planning and process improvement which helps our organization continue to move forward while supporting our mission.”

Robert Bolling, Chief Executive Officer, ChildSavers

“He is personable, has an infectious passion, is a great listener, does not withhold feedback, and knows how to highlight good work.”

Katie Botha, Vice President, Development & Communications, Special Olympics Virginia                                                                                                            

“She is energetic and enthusiastic about new ideas and projects. You can feel her energy when speaking to her, or when listening to her speak to others. Her main purpose as a leader is to empower others.”

Lindy Bumgarner, Executive Director, The Podium Foundation

“She is a leader, mentor, and fully committed to everyone that has a stake in our organization. Whether it be a student looking for career guidance or a board member wondering how they can further support our organization, she makes a continued effort to be there for them and communicate how she can help their aspirations.”

Sara Conlon, Executive Director, OAR of Richmond  

“A boss says what to do, a leader shows the way. She’s a leader.”

Stefanie Fedor, Executive Director, Visual Arts Center of Richmond

“While Stefanie’s effective leadership is exhibited in many ways each day, perhaps her most outstanding quality is her ability to engrain her passion for the arts into both her workplace and community. Her approach to leadership is not to order, but to coach.”

Myra Goodman Smith, President & CEO, Leadership Metro Richmond

“Authenticity, accountability and accessibility are what make Myra an effective leader.      Myra is always her true self.  She is an advocate for inclusion, a champion for diversity, and an exemplary servant leader.  She has a genuine love for the Richmond region and the many communities that it encompasses.”

Nadia Gooray, Program Director, Project Yoga Richmond

“She is always kind, compassionate, and makes a point to be aware of what is happening in our personal lives to make sure the organization supports staff through life’s many phases. Nadia focuses on the whole person and the whole organization, working hard to support staff and develop a work/life balance.”

Chris Hairston-White, VP of External Affairs, Better Housing Coalition   

“Chris leads by example. She’s a coach, an obstacle remover. She’s creative, energetic, hardworking, and expects excellence from all team members. She innately understands our strengths and capabilities, and uses these insights to draw the best from us.”

Jeanine Harper, Executive Director, Greater Richmond SCAN (Stop Child Abuse Now)

“Jeanine embodies the idea of going beyond the call of duty each and every day. She personifies the concept of servant leadership. She expects SCAN staff to give 100% during the work day, but she is always right there alongside you giving it 200%.”

Bettsy Heggie, Chief Operating Officer, GRASP (GReat Aspirations Scholarship Program, Inc.)

“One of her most positive attributes is that she sees you and listens.  Bettsy models kindness and good cheer for all of her staff and for GRASP students.  This enables staff to work collaboratively rather than competitively at all times, creating an atmosphere that lifts the spirits of staff as they arrive at work each day.”

Stephan Hicks, Executive Director, My Brother’s Keeper of Greater Richmond

“God-fearing, prayer warrior, compassionate, heart for people, dedicated, committed, go-getter, never quits. He’s the epitome of a leader.”

Margaret Hill, Executive Director, Hanover Education Foundation

“Margaret is an amazing supervisor.  She is able to lead and guide and make you feel as though you are part of a team at all times.  She allows you to take the reigns on projects she knows you can handle.”

Megan Hodges, Director of Development, NAMI Virginia

“It is evident from her involvement in her employees’ and volunteers’ time at work that she wants to see people succeed and grow while looking to prepare the best talent for the Richmond area non-profit scene. She is highly invested in her people and models excellent ethical and work behavioral choices in her role that set up those who work for her to learn best practices for a bright future at our organization and beyond.”

Bill Jones, Senior Vice President-Admin Services, Family Lifeline

“He is always willing to help or guide an employee in their endeavors.  He does not have the attitude of “that’s not my job” or “that’s beneath me”. He is a wonderful person to have as a Supervisor.”

Hunter Leemon, Executive Director, Sportable

“Hunter is such a positive guy full of enthusiasm and encouragement that overflows to the Sportable Team. He makes sure that things are in place for the team to also succeed.”

Blake MacIver, Executive Director, Advancement Services, VCU Development and Alumni Relations

Blake is endlessly positive and rarely critical.  Blake makes decisions and sticks with them, and is an agent of change and progress. He shares his knowledge with others, and fosters loyalty amongst staff members through his reliability.”

Nadine Marsh-Carter, President & CEO, Children’s Home Society of Virginia

“Our president has an open-door policy, she is always available to talk about ideas, suggestions or problems. When considering policy or change, she listens to other viewpoints and solicits input from the staff. The staff are the stars of the agency and we all shine under her leadership because we know we are part of a great team.”

Stephany Melton, Associate Director, NAMI Virginia

“Stephany helps develop the talents of those she supervises in a variety of ways. She encourages professional development, self-care and critical thinking. In addition to encouraging (and modeling) a healthy work-life balance, Stephany is not afraid to challenge herself while also challenging others. She has a quiet confidence about her that empowers others to try their best.  Most of all, she helps to develop talents of those she supervises by simply believing in them.”

Shawn Nicholson, Chief Operating Officer, Pathways

“Shawn has a can-do attitude, and is always positive in the face of adversity. Shawn is always open to suggestions or opinions from employees and coworkers and I feel that is paramount in a great boss.”

Jessica Philips, Executive VP and Chief Operating Officer, Commonwealth Autism 

“Jessica is a ray of sunshine.  She is always finding the bright-side in every situation.  She leads by professional example, provides support and encouragement, and provides effective feedback in the most tactful way.  Additionally, and probably most importantly, Jessica is a trustworthy boss and dependable friend.”

Diane Reale, Director of Volunteer Resources, Goochland Free Clinic and Family Services

“Diane is an effective leader because she leads by example. She is always willing to help another staff person or make time to discuss an issue, especially if it will help move a project forward. Diane is organized, so even during hectic days, she knows who is doing what and where everything is. That quality allows those working with her to be sure of their tasks and waste little time.”

John Shinholser, President, The McShin Foundation

“John’s visions for The McShin Foundation and our growth are endless.  He is constantly thinking of ways to better our community and solutions to the addiction epidemic.  His enthusiasm roars through our facility and he shows us how to be passionate about recovery.”

Jay Speer, Executive Director, Virginia Poverty Law Center

“Our Executive Director encourages and empowers us to take the lead on statewide policy and legislative issues and backs us up, which is very important.  He is a humble and soft-spoken person which is reflected in his leadership style.  His calm and thoughtful approach, even in the midst of crisis, is a great example to staff.”

Beth Vann-Turnbull, Executive Director, Housing Families First

“Beth regularly strives to not only highlight each staff members strengths but utilizes those strengths to build the agency to its full potential. Staff are regularly asked to participate in changes to the agency that have enabled us to be a low-barrier shelter and create an environment that clients, staff, volunteers, and guests feel good about.”

Congratulations to all of the 2017 Great Nonprofit Bosses!  We hope you will join us at YNPN RVA’s Great Nonprofit Bosses Celebration Event on 11/1!  All are welcome!

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Creating An Inclusive Environment at Your Nonprofit: Age

In March, The Community Foundation Serving Richmond and Central Virginia gathered alumni of its Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program (ENLP) and current members of its 10th class at the Black History Museum and Cultural Center of Virginia.   Jonathan Zur, President and CEO of Virginia Center for Inclusive Communities led the group through a robust discussion and brainstorming session on ways local organizations and leaders can take action to create a culture of diversity and inclusion in their nonprofit organizations and across the sector.

In a recent blog post, we shared that diversity is the presence of difference generally related to one’s identity and might include ability status, age, ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  Inclusion is the accepting, respecting, and valuing of this diversity.  Working to achieve diversity and inclusion in the workplace should be a fundamental part of fulfilling the mission of any nonprofit. It creates an environment of involvement and connection and allows for the richness of ideas, backgrounds and perspectives to be harnessed to create value for the organization, clients and the community.

To begin moving towards active inclusion in the workplace, nonprofit leaders must 1) examine their own lens to have a deeper understanding of their perspectives and perceptions to create a framework for approaching and addressing their own bias – whether that be conscious or unconscious.  Nonprofit leaders must 2) ask and encourage tough questions to create deeper dialogue within their organization, especially with staff who come from different backgrounds than them.  This will allow the leader to develop a clearer understanding of how experiences affect work styles, behavior, communications, and relationships and eventually form an atmosphere of greater trust.  Nonprofit leaders must 3) acknowledge institutional bias, which are the practices, policies, structures and traditions that push some people up and others down based solely on identity. It’s important leaders realize that institutional bias may exist in their own organization causing barriers towards inclusion and ultimately, equity and justice.

 

Local Barriers and Suggestions for Interventions

What are some of the barriers that organizations, leaders and staff create in local nonprofit organizations that prevent diversity and inclusion (in both the workplace itself and with clients and the community)? What are actions steps that they can take to intervene and overcome these barriers, leading to a more inclusive nonprofit environment?  The Emerging Nonprofit Leaders group analyzed several different “Identities” in relation to their own organization and below are the findings.  This week we focus on one of nine identities – “Age”.  In later posts, we will focus in on the others – ethnicity, gender, race, religion, sexual orientation, socio-economic status or other factors that make a person unique.  Make sure to read our previous post on Ability Status.

Age

Ageism is the stereotyping or discrimination of a person or group of people because of their age.  Typically, ageism refers to older individuals but more recently, the definition has broadened to include “any prejudice or discrimination against or in favor of any age group.”

Local nonprofit leaders saw a few patterns and occurrences in the workplace – particularly relating to ageism perceptions and the negative implications they can have.   The group discovered that individuals are often grouped into categories related to interests and abilities based on age.  For example, younger staff were considered more tech savvy, while older staff were thought to be uninterested in technology and not willing to learn.

Other occurrences included assumptions and perceptions based on age related to one’s viewpoints, work styles and work ethics.  Younger participants reported having issues with their perspectives not being valued or taken seriously, as well as having a perceived “lack of experience” and not being given the opportunity to give input or perform.  Older participants reported that their perspectives were considered outdated, and therefore not valued, as well as feeling discriminated against in the hiring process – with assumptions being made that “an organization can’t afford to hire me”.

A recent article in Profiles in Diversity Journal confirmed many of these sentiments saying, “Within each generation is a relatively benign but present ageist view on the surrounding generations. Boomers think Millennials are careless and, although educated, only educated topically; they can do their jobs, but take away their computers and they won’t have a clue, unlike Boomers and Generation X. Millennials tend to think of Boomers and Generation X as behind the times as well as technology-resistant and inept. What all generations need to understand is that that everyone benefits from generational diversity in the workplace.”

The group had many great ideas on interventions to overcome some of these barriers to move towards generational diversity and inclusion in the workplace.  One of the most important tactics is education against stereotypes in the workplace.  Another suggestion is to create occasions (facilitated or not) for intergenerational conversation topics, or go a step further and create intentional intergenerational project teams.  Read this article by the Nonprofit Times on 8 Steps to Creating an Age Diverse Culture for tips to get started.

Other ideas included creating opportunities like mentorships and/or internships to promote intergenerational interaction and relationship building.  The Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA (YNPN RVA) has tips for mentors and mentees for Building Relationships, and this article by Next Avenue explains the concept of “Reverse Mentorships” where an older worker might seek out guidance from a much younger worker.  If you’re looking for advice for creating an internship, you can check out ConnectVA’s many articles on related topics, as well as our “Connect to Students” page which shares contact information from each local school/department for finding interns.

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YNPN RVA Recommends: Advice for Developing Your Nonprofit Staff

While mission and impact are the heart and soul of a nonprofit, there are many integral parts behind the scenes that make the magic happen. Beyond defining your mission and establishing metrics to measure your impact, it is essential to nurture your people. Yes, your people are your volunteers, donors and supporters, but your people are first and foremost your staff. The hardworking nonprofiteer that is daily putting your mission into action – teaching parents financial literacy, educating teens on healthy lifestyle choices, or providing meals to hungry children. And yet, many organization and nonprofit executives neglect or lack any formal strategic talent development or career progression plan for their staff – and to their loss

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Nonprofit Trends: Challenges for Young Nonprofit Professionals in RVA

In mid-January, The Community Foundations serving Richmond and Central Virginia brought together two of their nonprofit networks – YNPN RVA (Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA) and ENLP Alumni (Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program Alumni) for breakfast, information-sharing and discussion at Peter Paul Development Center. For those who aren’t familiar - YNPN RVA (the local chapter of the National organization/network) supports the growth, learning, and development of young and early-career nonprofit professionals through professional development, networking, and social opportunities (learn more about YNPN RVA here). The Emerging Nonprofit Leaders Program, now in its 10th year of operation, is a dynamic eight-month experience for budding nonprofit leaders in the metro Richmond area. Participants have the opportunity to foster a deeper understanding of their leadership capacity, advance their understanding and practice of leading in the nonprofit sector, and strengthen their network of nonprofit colleagues (learn more about ENLP here and come to an information session – dates announced in March 2017). During the breakfast, there was a facilitated discussion around the biggest barriers and challenges for young nonprofit professionals in RVA. Fairly quickly, themes began to emerge, as many audience members shared similar experiences and obstacles. The group continued the discussion of specific challenges by generating ideas, tips and advice for how a young nonprofit professional (or how an organization employing a young nonprofit professional) could work to overcome some of these challenges and barriers. Here are some of the main challenges that were discussed:

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ConnectVA Event: Nonprofit & Social Services Career Fair with VCU

Find the right talent to meet your diverse recruitment needs during our annual Nonprofit and Social Services Career Fair. This three hour event draws several hundred students each year from a broad range of disciplines, including arts, business, communications, and the sciences. We invite you to join us for what will be an engaging and informative afternoon for students and the nonprofit community (and yes, the event is open to all job seekers).

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Tips for Getting Started in Fundraising in RVA

tips-for-fundraising-in-rva

Laurie Rogers shares her “Top Tips” for getting started in fundraising – don’t forget to register for the Fundraising Crash Course coming up to get more insights on fundraising fundamentals and how to best go about your role as a development professional in RVA!

  1. Get to know the donors to your agency. Fundraising is relational and donors are not ATMs. Find out why people give (I will provide a list of opening questions to get that kind of conversation started in my class). To do that, you have to talk less and listen more……
  1. How does your agency tell its story? Is it all about your agency and what you do and how you do it? If that’s the case, time to change it up to appeal to the donor. WHY should a donor invest with you?
  1. For RVA in particular, that “seven degrees of separation” thing does not work here! It will soon appear to you that everyone in this town is related to everyone else. Be careful when discussing anyone or any situation, especially in public.
  1. Remember that the first word in fundraising is “FUN” so enjoy your new position, be curious and take every opportunity to learn via workshops, classes, webinars, etc. and welcome to the BEST vocation you could ever imagine.

Join the Fundraising Crash Course on 1/10/17!

Fundraising Crash Course provides a working map of the terrain for people new to fundraising, whether you’re an employee at a small nonprofit newly tasked with raising funds or a board member who wants a better big-picture understanding of what’s going on. We review the basics of fundraising, including

  • sources of funding;
  • the essential elements of a fundraising plan and how to go about creating one that works for your situation;
  • why donors give and why it’s important that you communicate with them in a variety of ways so that they’ll give again;
  • the role of boards in development, and how to engage your board in the fundraising process;
  • tapping into the powers of your existing networks and constituencies;
  • viewing fundraising from the perspective of a funder
  • other tips to help small Development offices maximize the impact of their work.

You’ll leave this session with a better understanding of fundraising and the ability to continue developing your own fundraising plans.

TIP: Check out the Fundraising Resource page for local grant-making information, databases and more!
 

Laurie Rogers has been a development professional for 25 years in Richmond. She has served as a Director of the Annual Fund, Director of Development and Director of a $30 million Capital Campaign. For the past 21 years, she has served as an independent grant writer for an array of nonprofit agencies in the metro area. She has taught fundraising classes in Richmond and Charlottesville for most of that time and continually participates in webinars and workshops to ensure her own skills are current and honed. She has a BA in Political Science from Sewanee and a Master’s of Public Policy from Duke University.

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YNPN RVA Spotlight: Great Nonprofit Bosses Part 2

It’s the time of year for giving thanks – and we want to say a big “thank you” to all of the fantastic leaders in our local nonprofit sector! This week’s “Spotlight” is from the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA (YNPN RVA). Over the past several weeks, YNPN RVA sent out a call to young nonprofit professionals all over Greater Richmond to nominate their boss to be recognized as a part of the “Great Nonprofit Bosses” Initiative. In total, 37 bosses were nominated by 57 different young nonprofit professionals; from that group, a YNPN RVA panel selected the top 9 outstanding and compelling nominations.

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YNPN RVA Spotlight: Great Nonprofit Bosses part 1

It's the time of year for giving thanks - and we want to say a big "thank you" to all of the fantastic leaders in our local nonprofit sector! This week's "Spotlight" is from the Young Nonprofit Professionals Network RVA (YNPN RVA). Over the past several weeks, YNPN RVA sent out a call to young nonprofit professionals all over Greater Richmond to nominate their boss to be recognized as a part of the “Great Nonprofit Bosses” Initiative. In total, 37 bosses were nominated by 57 different young nonprofit professionals; from that group, a YNPN RVA panel selected the top 9 outstanding and compelling nominations.

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Great Nonprofit Bosses in RVA Nominees 2016

The Young Nonprofits Professional Network RVA (YNPN RVA) believes that a great boss or supervisor supports, inspires and pushes others towards excellence; is an effective communicator, passionate, intuitive and resourceful; and finally, is truly committed to developing the careers of the people they supervise. Over the past several weeks, YNPN RVA sent out a call to young nonprofit professionals all over Greater Richmond to nominate their boss to be recognized as a part of our "Great Nonprofit Bosses" Initiative. In total, 37 bosses were nominated by 57 different young nonprofit professionals; from that group, a YNPN RVA panel selected the top 9 outstanding and compelling nominations (top 9 denoted in orange). Below are all of the nonprofit bosses who were nominated, along with an excerpt from the accolades they received from the person they supervise!

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